See You at The Met! – Friday March 24, 6-8 pm

Dear Students, Parents and Educators,
You’re invited to the Opening Reception of the Gold Key Art Exhibition at The Met on Friday March 24, 6:00-8:00 pm. The exhibition features Gold Key artwork and writing created by NYC’s most talented teens. All are invited and no RSVP required. Come celebrate the 2017 NYC award recipients and design your own tote bag too!
  • Was your 2017 Art submission awarded recognition at the Honorable Mention or Silver Key level? If so, your work will be displayed digitally at the Opening Reception!
  • Was your 2017 Writing submission awarded recognition at the Honorable Mention, Silver Key, or Gold Key level? If so, you’re encouraged to enter a lottery to read an excerpt of your work at the Opening Reception. Student readings will be limited to three (3) minutes and the countdown begins after you’re handed the microphone. Interested? Enter the lottery at the opening reception from 6:00-6:25 pm. The Honorable Mention/Silver Key and Gold Key lineups will be announced at 6:45 pm after the Welcome Remarks are concluded. Refer to the program schedule for more details.
  •  Design Your Own Tote Bag! A free workshop will be offered to all guests.
  • Free Admission Ticket! All guests will receive a free ticket to view the rest of the museum’s collections. We hope you check out the galleries after enjoying yourself at the Opening Reception.
Scroll down for more information about the Opening Reception.
Scholastic Art & Writing Awards
New York City Regional Exhibition Opening Reception
Friday, March 24, 2017, 6:00-8:00 pm
Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
6:00-8:00 pm
  • View the exhibition of Gold Key works of Art including Film & Animation and Writing from grades 7-12
  • Read Gold Key writing from grades 7-12 on iPads in the Exhibition and in bound notebooks in the Nolen Library
  • See Middle School, 3D and Oversize Gold Key works on a film reel in the Carson Family Hall
  • View a screening of Silver Key and Honorable Mention works of art from grades 7-12 in the Seminar Room
  • Meet Pratt Institute in the Carson Family Hall
6:30-6:45 pm
Welcome Remarks, Carson Family Hall, ground floor
6:45-8:00 pm
Honorable Mention and Silver Key Student Readings
Honorable Mention and Silver Key recipients read short excerpts from their works (up to 3 minutes) in the Carroll Classroom. Readers selected by lottery. Eligible readers may sign-up for the lottery in the Carroll Classroom, 6:00-6:25 pm.
Gold Key Student Readings
Gold Key recipients read short excerpts (up to 3 minutes) from their works in the Carson Family Hall. Readers will be selected by lottery. Eligible readers may sign-up for the lottery in the Nolen Library, 6:00-6:25 pm.
Make a Tote Bag!
Facilitated by The Met. Get creative by designing your very own tote bag in the Studio. Explore how words can become art by engaging with images of primary works of art from the Museum’s collection to spark tote bag design inspiration!
The Museum is open until 9:00 pm. We hope you will explore and enjoy the galleries!

Today (12/16) is NYC Submission Deadline

NYC Educators and Students,

Tomorrow December 16th is the deadline for submissions. Student work must be uploaded by 11:59 pm.

SUBMISSION FORMS MUST BE POSTMARKED BY DECEMBER 16th. The best way to ensure that a submission form is postmarked is to personally visit a post office and hand deliver your envelope to a window agent and request that your properly stamped envelope be postmarked to demonstrate compliance with a deadline.

LAST MINUTE RESOURCE: Do not despair if you’re scrambling at the last minute. The James Farley Main Post Office at 421 8th Ave in Manhattan is open until 10 pm.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Does the submission form have to be received by December 16th or postmarked by December 16th? It must be postmarked by December 16th.

Can I hand deliver my submission form(s) to the Scholastic office?  Delivery via snail mail is recommended, however, you may drop off your submission at the reception desk on the 1st floor of the Scholastic Inc. headquarter building at 557 Broadway. It will be staffed until 7 pm.

Does an educator need to sign the submission form? Yes an educator needs to sign the form irrespective of how and when the work being submitted was prepared. Any educator at a student’s school may sign the form.

I have an exigent circumstance. Can the deadline be extended? No. The deadline of 12/16, 11:59 pm is absolute for all NYC students.

Where can I find the submission form? After logging onto artandwriting.org, you’ll see “Welcome to your dashboard”. Below, you’ll see 1. My Profile, 2. My Uploads and 3. Print, Sign & Mail Your Forms, and Pay For Your Submission. To the right there is a button labeled See My Submission Form And Payment Options. Click on that button to generate your submission form.

 

Reminder: Submission Deadline is December 16th

This is a reminder that the deadline for submissions is Wednesday, December 16th, only two weeks away!

Don’t forget about our newest award category, Editorial Cartoons.

The category, Editorial Cartoons, sponsored by The Herb Block Foundation, is designated for artwork that conveys a political theme or message. Up to three Medal recipients in this category will each be awarded a scholarship of $1,000. This is an incredible opportunity for teens to be recognized and celebrated for their talent and ideas. A fee waiver is available to any student with a financial need.

Editorial cartoons may be in the form of, but are not limited to single panel drawings with captions, sequential comic art, illustrations, digitally created drawings, or animated films with a political theme or message. I sincerely hope that all NYC teens share their unique perspectives about current local and world issues by participating!

Postscript to a Twenty-Volume Suicide Note

Postscript to a Twenty-Volume Suicide Note

By Lucy Wainger, 11th Grade, Stuyvesant High School

2015 Gold Key in Poetry

(Image Credit: Eclipse by Allegra Brogard, 11th Grade, Lycee Francais de New York, Gold Key, Photography)

        after Amiri Baraka

I look up
the stairwell
and see only empty
space through which to
fall/ And I look down the stairwell and see only empty space through which to fall
And back away from the banister, now it’s just the same, the family will send
Their feeble condolences and I will pour them over myself in angry red
Bliss/bless, someone else figure out the difference, someone ask
What was “going through my head” but how can I answer that when I never
Even knew my head was permeable, is that like a kind of diffusion,
How skin can let some things go through, the things it wants to, now
Does that imply skin could let everything go through if it wanted to,
But then my question is who decides, is it the whole skin that goes
I WANT THIS BACTERIUM NOT THAT ONE a joint effort type thing
Or is there a single or group of cells that holds the all the other skin
Under its control, could make it waver surface tension if it wanted to
Or could just let everything go through, dust motes, mosquitoes,
The hair on the floor of the barber shop, Baby are you sure you
Want to cut it all off?, little blue-green gemstones not yet discovered
By humans but which still float in the thin white air anyway as did math
Before we touched it, and as did language before we stuck our
Tongues in it, and as did eggs and sperm before anybody figured out
How to fuck, which was approximately three months ago, and which
Is probably the closest you can get to someone, or at least to
Turning into what’s inside you, and I guess today what’s inside
Me is resin and tulips and the acrid taste of not regret but a
Grinning version of it like Don’t you know they’ve already got you?
Written on the bathroom stall wall, don’t you know you’re made for
Falling, you do it every night into sleep and if you’re lucky some hazy dream
Maybe I’m just tired of it, maybe I wanted someone to catch me
By the scruff of the neck or the lungs or the hands, maybe I miss
The four calling-cards of white, snow/salt/milk/cum and your hands
Are white plastic, and your coats are very white coats, like dishcloth
Ashes, like SNOW GENERAL ALL OVER IRELAND, the faces
In the yearbooks and the man saying you’re-them-you-just-don’t-
Know-it-yet, so what if the lights are all ugly now, we’ve watched
This movie a thousand times, don’t you know the ending won’t change,
Don’t you see it still isn’t over?

To Young Writers From Kayla Heisler

June by Jane Baldwin, 2015 Honorable Mention, Photography, 10th Grade, Trinity School
June by Jane Baldwin, 2015 Honorable Mention, Photography, 10th Grade, Trinity School

Kayla Heisler and LaTroya Lovell spoke at a reading we hosted for young writers outside of the New York City region who do not have an Affiliate for the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, and therefore usually receive no recognition other than their certificates and keys.  Their words were so direct and insightful, I asked if we could publish them here for all writers to read.

Kayla Heisler’s advice to young writers can be found below.  Please click here to read LaTroya Lovell’s words.

“Being writers gives us a unique position in the world. Every person has a story, but not everyone feels they have the skill to tell it; not everyone notices that there are stories worth telling. That’s what makes being a writer so special—we notice things and bring people to focus their attention on things that they might otherwise never think to care about.

Our biggest jobs as writers are to learn and teach.

Listen to feedback. I know sometimes it can be difficult to hear, but taking advice from your teachers or other writers can improve your writing terrifically. Don’t take criticism personally—if someone’s taking the time to read your work and give you feedback, it’s because they want to see you succeed. I can’t stress enough how important it is to get advice from other people on your work. It’s easy to fall into bad writing habits and never realize that we’re doing them until another person points them out.

For me, the most important aspect of the writing life is reading. Read everything your teachers tell you to read—even the stuff that doesn’t seem interesting at first. If they’re having you read it, it’s for a good reason. In high school, many of the books that inspired me the most were the ones assigned in class, and many of the ones that were initially the most difficult to get into proved to be the most rewarding—such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Victor Hugo’s Les Miserables. It’s also crucial that you seek out works on your own. Read as often as you can and read widely.

In addition to literature, draw inspiration from other creative sources—from artwork, movies, plays, music, photographs. One thing that’s helped me immensely as a writer is to carry around a small notebook, so when inspiration strikes, I can make a note of what I think or feel and express it through writing.

Listen by Delia Cadman, 2015 Honorable Mention, Printmaking, 10th Grade, Fiorello H LaGuardia High School of Music
Listen by Delia Cadman, 2015 Honorable Mention, Printmaking, 10th Grade, Fiorello H LaGuardia High School of Music

Learn from your peers, and inspire others. Everyone on the planet knows something you don’t know—even your fellow writers who are your age or younger. Last week I went to a staged reading of a play written by a freshman at my school. The only reason I went was because the playwright walked up to me in the cafeteria out of nowhere and invited me to go, and I figured anyone who had that amount of confidence in their work had to be producing great content. Before I went, I’d been struggling with major writer’s block, but the play was extremely thought provoking, and after I left I had so much going on in my head, I didn’t know what to write about first. When you put time and effort into something, you have a right to be proud of it, so have the courage to show it to others. No man is an island, so be brave, and put your content out into the world, and make sure you let people, especially other artists know that it’s there.

Ultimately, as writers, we have an obligation to make others empathize with others. Our creative output influences the world, and it is through our work that voices are heard and changes are made. Never stop learning, teaching, inspiring and creating. Write fearlessly; write frequently; and write with the knowledge that your words have power.”

-Kayla Heisler

 

Kayla Heisler is a student at Eugene Lang College pursuing a degree in Literary Studies with a writing conversation. Her work appears in Eleven-and-a-Half literary journal and will appear on the Helen Literary Magazine blog. She enjoys writing poetry and short fiction, but she focuses most strongly on personal and research-based non-fiction. Kayla grew up in North and South Carolina and enjoys hiking and star-gazing when she returns home from the city. She has loved writing stories and reading books since childhood, and she feels that writing is the most important way she contributes to the world.

To Young Writers From LaTroya Lovell

Bubble by Jack Freedman, 2015 Silver Key Photography, 12th Grade, Packer Collegiate Institute
Bubble by Jack Freedman, 2015 Silver Key Photography, 12th Grade, Packer Collegiate Institute

LaTroya Lovell and Kayla Heisler spoke at a reading we hosted for young writers outside of the New York City region who do not have an Affiliate for the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, and therefore usually receive no recognition other than their certificates and keys.  Their words were so direct and insightful, I asked if we could publish them here for all writers to read.

LaTroya Lovell’s advice to young writers can be found below.  Please click here to read Kayla Heisler’s words.

“To me, writing and art are one in the same rather than two separate entities. Writing is the painting of one’s voice. Us writers come with the innate ability to capture the voice within us and get it down on the page in the same preciseness an artist uses to perfect a painting. We practice, we get better. Through our pens we let out what seems an almost burning longing, the words of our inner world. Joan Didion says that “we tell ourselves stories to live,” and there is no better way to explain the nature of the writer. While you all are young and budding with talent, remember this one thing right before you sit down to write; there will be times when you feel it necessary to censor yourself, to change your words for the sake of acceptance, to change your words to make a group feel comfortable, don’t do it. There is a reason why the situation claws at you the way that it does, that is your story. Never mask your voice, that is the very thing that fuels the writer. “

LaTroya Lovell is a junior at The New School, where she is on the Dean’s List; majoring in Literature/writing and Gender Studies. She is a nonfiction writer and has been writing for seven years, born and bred in Harlem, New York. Most of her current work falls into the brackets of poetry, personal narrative, and critical essays; that focus on minority issues, with a predominance for woman experiences. Outside of writing, LaTroya is involved with several projects that focus on youth and woman’s outreach. She believes that writing is an innate ability that only a few get the privilege to call “their talent.” This talent fosters voices that break through barriers in the perpetual way, that no other art form can.

Deadline Extended for Teen Art Gallery! – March 6th!

T.A.G. (Teen Art Gallery) is accepting submissions for their 2015 Art Exhibition!  T.A.G. is one of NYC Scholastic Art & Writing Awards’ favorite programs!  They are run by teens for teens.  If you submitted to the Awards, why not submit to T.A.G. as well?

Teen Art Gallery is a group formed and run by teens from different schools in NYC to 10455234_727768350595297_3273411259554446510_nexhibit art created by teens from around the world.  Our mission is to make it possible for teenage artists to show their work in real galleries.

We produce several art exhibits each year in Manhattan. Our gallery shows feature artwork created by teens from around the world in all categories, including: Photography, Performance, Poetry, Video, Writing, Comics, Animation, Installation, Painting, Drawing, and Sculpture.

T.A.G. Mission Statement

For some young-adults, the art world– full of white walls, art dealers and established artists–can be intimidating. We may have difficulty approaching this world even if we are well endowed in both maturity and talent. Our difficulty is partly due to the lack of knowledge that coincides with the limiting environment assigned to us because of our age. T.A.G.’s goal is to eliminate this limitation when present and provide fellow teenaged-students with the opportunity to take part in displaying their works in a gallery. T.A.G. reaches out to all young artists so that they are not alone in figuring out the process of showing their work in a gallery setting.

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Many teenagers are immensely talented and sophisticated in their use of techniques, such that their place in a gallery is beyond well deserved.

For details on how to submit please visit T.A.G.’s FAQ page by clicking here!

Emoti-Con Design Fellow Applications Due January 9th!

Our pals at Parsons are accepting applications to become a Parsons Emoti-Con Design Fellow!

What does this mean?

Emoti-Con is the annual NYC Youth Digital Media & Technology Challenge. The Emoti-Con! Design Fellows are the youth who make Emoti-Con happen! Design Fellows work on graphic design projects (signs, t-shirts, flyers), post on social media to spread the word and get people excited, and help teens get prepared to participate. They also help plan the day, coming up with ideas for everything from swag and giveaways to what speakers should be on the stage. On the day of Emoti-Con, the Design Fellows are the greeters, MCs, and show-runners, and create a brand-new game or design challenge every year that every single person who comes to Emoti-Con participates in! (Note: The Emoti-Con Design Fellows program used to be called “A-Team.”)Emoti-Con group

What do you have to do?

-Be in 9th, 10th, 11th, or 12th grade in NYC!

-Commit to attending 9-11 of the Free Saturday sessions at Parsons The New School for Design January 31-April 18 (except March 28), from 10:00am-1:00pm.

What’s in it for you? (In addition to knowing that you are totally awesome and you have been part of something AMAZING, you will…)

* gain experience in graphic design, game design, event planning, and public speaking from a Parsons instructor — all great skills for college applications, job applications, and life!
* meet awesome teens from across NYC!
* be able to request a transcript you can use for college applications, which will say that you completed a Parsons Pre-College Academy class!
* receive a letter of recommendation from the instructor that you can use for college applications!

DetailsEmoti-Con happy

Applications are due January 9th, 2015.

Applications & more information available here!

Take a look at past the Emoti-Cons and learn about the cool projects teens are creating that positively affect the world around them here!

parsons-the-new-school-for-design-logo-61dtuatu

Upcoming Events at the Met!

Did you know the Met offers free programming for NYC Teens?  Time to plan for a rough winter?  hang out with the Met’s masterpieces and make some of your own!

Take a look below and see what is coming up.  These programs are free but the spots fill up, so click on the links and reserve your spot ASAP.

 Swimming at Ōiso, Distant View of Mount Fuji (detail), Meiji period (1868–1912), 1893. Japan.
Swimming at Ōiso, Distant View of Mount Fuji (detail), Meiji period (1868–1912), 1893. Japan.

On Friday, Dec. 12th, explore careers in the arts at Career Lab: Write, then create your own poetry inspired by works of art at Get Wrapped Up: Poetry and the Art of the Kimono – Poetry Workshop!

Surupa Sen and Bijayini Satpathy, the principal dancers of India’s world-renowned Nrityagram dance troupe
Surupa Sen and Bijayini Satpathy, the principal dancers of India’s world-renowned Nrityagram dance troupe

On Saturday, January 10th, join other teens for Saturday Sketching: Vessels & Volumes (all materials are provided!) then stick around for the 5pm performance of Nrityagram by a traditional Indian dance troupe.

See you there!

 

Submissions are open for Teen Art Gallery!

T.A.G. (Teen Art Gallery) is accepting submissions for their 2015 Art Exhibition!  T.A.G. is one of NYC Scholastic Art & Writing Awards’ favorite programs!  They are run by teens for teens.  If you are planning on submitting to the Awards, why not submit to T.A.G. as well?

Teen Art Gallery is a group formed and run by teens from different schools in NYC to exhibit art created by teens from around the world.  Our mission is to make it possible for teenage artists to show their work in real galleries.

We produce several art exhibits each year in Manhattan. Our gallery shows feature artwork created by teens from around the world in all categories, including: Photography, Performance, Poetry, Video, Writing, Comics, Animation, Installation, Painting, Drawing, and Sculpture.

T.A.G. Mission Statement

For some young-adults, the art world– full of white walls, art dealers and established artists–can be intimidating. We may have difficulty approaching this world even if we are well endowed in both maturity and talent. Our difficulty is partly due to the lack of knowledge that coincides with the limiting environment assigned to us because of our age. T.A.G.’s goal is to eliminate this limitation when present and provide fellow teenaged-students with the opportunity to take part in displaying their works in a gallery. T.A.G. reaches out to all young artists so that they are not alone in figuring out the process of showing their work in a gallery setting.

Many teenagers are immensely talented and sophisticated in their use of techniques, such that their place in a gallery is beyond well deserved.

For details on how to submit please visit T.A.G.’s FAQ page by clicking here!