See You at The Met! – Friday March 24, 6-8 pm

Dear Students, Parents and Educators,
You’re invited to the Opening Reception of the Gold Key Art Exhibition at The Met on Friday March 24, 6:00-8:00 pm. The exhibition features Gold Key artwork and writing created by NYC’s most talented teens. All are invited and no RSVP required. Come celebrate the 2017 NYC award recipients and design your own tote bag too!
  • Was your 2017 Art submission awarded recognition at the Honorable Mention or Silver Key level? If so, your work will be displayed digitally at the Opening Reception!
  • Was your 2017 Writing submission awarded recognition at the Honorable Mention, Silver Key, or Gold Key level? If so, you’re encouraged to enter a lottery to read an excerpt of your work at the Opening Reception. Student readings will be limited to three (3) minutes and the countdown begins after you’re handed the microphone. Interested? Enter the lottery at the opening reception from 6:00-6:25 pm. The Honorable Mention/Silver Key and Gold Key lineups will be announced at 6:45 pm after the Welcome Remarks are concluded. Refer to the program schedule for more details.
  •  Design Your Own Tote Bag! A free workshop will be offered to all guests.
  • Free Admission Ticket! All guests will receive a free ticket to view the rest of the museum’s collections. We hope you check out the galleries after enjoying yourself at the Opening Reception.
Scroll down for more information about the Opening Reception.
Scholastic Art & Writing Awards
New York City Regional Exhibition Opening Reception
Friday, March 24, 2017, 6:00-8:00 pm
Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
6:00-8:00 pm
  • View the exhibition of Gold Key works of Art including Film & Animation and Writing from grades 7-12
  • Read Gold Key writing from grades 7-12 on iPads in the Exhibition and in bound notebooks in the Nolen Library
  • See Middle School, 3D and Oversize Gold Key works on a film reel in the Carson Family Hall
  • View a screening of Silver Key and Honorable Mention works of art from grades 7-12 in the Seminar Room
  • Meet Pratt Institute in the Carson Family Hall
6:30-6:45 pm
Welcome Remarks, Carson Family Hall, ground floor
6:45-8:00 pm
Honorable Mention and Silver Key Student Readings
Honorable Mention and Silver Key recipients read short excerpts from their works (up to 3 minutes) in the Carroll Classroom. Readers selected by lottery. Eligible readers may sign-up for the lottery in the Carroll Classroom, 6:00-6:25 pm.
Gold Key Student Readings
Gold Key recipients read short excerpts (up to 3 minutes) from their works in the Carson Family Hall. Readers will be selected by lottery. Eligible readers may sign-up for the lottery in the Nolen Library, 6:00-6:25 pm.
Make a Tote Bag!
Facilitated by The Met. Get creative by designing your very own tote bag in the Studio. Explore how words can become art by engaging with images of primary works of art from the Museum’s collection to spark tote bag design inspiration!
The Museum is open until 9:00 pm. We hope you will explore and enjoy the galleries!

2016 August Intensive in Partnership with NAACP ACT-SO

This summer middle and high students from the greater NYC metropolitan area participated in a pilot outreach program, August Intensive August 16-19.They engaged in four days of art and writing workshops and field trips too! Art students spent the week learning about and creating zines, social justice posters inspired by Keith Haring and learning how to approach the creation of a compelling portfolio.Writing students spent the week expanding their thinking about poetry, defining their voice in their writings and thinking critically about the scope and content and their portfolios. Students were joined by representatives from ACT-SO, Ashcan Studio of Art, SVA, The New School and Writopia who shared useful information about their program offerings to teens. August Intensive wrapped up with outings to Getty Images, Essence Magazine, Miguel Luciano’s art studio and The New York Times to  experience what it means to be a professional artist/writer.

 

Thank you to the wonderful instructors and guest speakers who shared their time, positive energy and knowledge!

Another thank you to the awesome people who received students in their place of work:

Last but not least, thank you to the incredible teens who participated in the first ever August Intensive at Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. I hope you enjoyed the experience and are off to a fantastic start to the school year. I will be in touch with participants soon with details about a follow-up session created especially for you to have the opportunity and guidance in fine tuning work you plan to submit.

Visit often for updates about upcoming opportunities to participate in free workshops.

Today (12/16) is NYC Submission Deadline

NYC Educators and Students,

Tomorrow December 16th is the deadline for submissions. Student work must be uploaded by 11:59 pm.

SUBMISSION FORMS MUST BE POSTMARKED BY DECEMBER 16th. The best way to ensure that a submission form is postmarked is to personally visit a post office and hand deliver your envelope to a window agent and request that your properly stamped envelope be postmarked to demonstrate compliance with a deadline.

LAST MINUTE RESOURCE: Do not despair if you’re scrambling at the last minute. The James Farley Main Post Office at 421 8th Ave in Manhattan is open until 10 pm.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Does the submission form have to be received by December 16th or postmarked by December 16th? It must be postmarked by December 16th.

Can I hand deliver my submission form(s) to the Scholastic office?  Delivery via snail mail is recommended, however, you may drop off your submission at the reception desk on the 1st floor of the Scholastic Inc. headquarter building at 557 Broadway. It will be staffed until 7 pm.

Does an educator need to sign the submission form? Yes an educator needs to sign the form irrespective of how and when the work being submitted was prepared. Any educator at a student’s school may sign the form.

I have an exigent circumstance. Can the deadline be extended? No. The deadline of 12/16, 11:59 pm is absolute for all NYC students.

Where can I find the submission form? After logging onto artandwriting.org, you’ll see “Welcome to your dashboard”. Below, you’ll see 1. My Profile, 2. My Uploads and 3. Print, Sign & Mail Your Forms, and Pay For Your Submission. To the right there is a button labeled See My Submission Form And Payment Options. Click on that button to generate your submission form.

 

Reminder: Submission Deadline is December 16th

This is a reminder that the deadline for submissions is Wednesday, December 16th, only two weeks away!

Don’t forget about our newest award category, Editorial Cartoons.

The category, Editorial Cartoons, sponsored by The Herb Block Foundation, is designated for artwork that conveys a political theme or message. Up to three Medal recipients in this category will each be awarded a scholarship of $1,000. This is an incredible opportunity for teens to be recognized and celebrated for their talent and ideas. A fee waiver is available to any student with a financial need.

Editorial cartoons may be in the form of, but are not limited to single panel drawings with captions, sequential comic art, illustrations, digitally created drawings, or animated films with a political theme or message. I sincerely hope that all NYC teens share their unique perspectives about current local and world issues by participating!

American Voices Nominee: Nkosi Nkululeko

The Gone Game

By Nkosi Nkululeko, 12th Grade, Home Schooled

2015 Gold Key/American Voices Nominee, Poetry

(Image Credit: Music Heals by Maria Tinoco, 11th Grade, Children’s Professional School, 2015 Gold Key, Drawing & Illustration)

These days, there always be an ocean of spirits
flooding the streets
yearnin to at least become memory,
tucked in the wallet or
some amulet owed to the girl that went over yonder
and never came back to her old folk cryin’ a river
and I think I hear them, playin’
an elegy amid a village of trees,

perched upon branches singin’ a blues Billy used to and their skin,
brazen like a sunrise, be coated in some shadow and dusk

for the moon hides them well and even sun
casts a maleficent dark
for their body to drape into

and they be gone like a vesper hymn in the night,

an evenin’ prayer whisperin’ to the trees
of some secret they’d never gather
and we’ve been looking for them for some time now,
callin’ for their blood to resurrect.

Render us that pinch o’ wisdom
they done took down to bury with their own collection of bones.

“Come out. Where you be at, son?”
“We was playin’ hide and go seek and he never came back”

I can smell the scent of his laughter still,
nesting in the thorn arms of a flower patch.
This is bliss in its moment
of extinction,

“Maybe she’s here!”

We unearth this world,
for a hint of existence,
some draft of wind that will
open the gates to where the dead lie.

“Dammit, this is only a hand.”
Covered in barbed wire, guitar strings and a eulogy
“I remember when his hands made that magic. He was good player. Played like the dead would have.”

—“Speaking of hands
‘Fore she left, she never taught me how to strum the rib of a guitar.
How to extract a colony of sound from mouth to a finger.
How to make the rhythm we ride into a tangible thing.
She held it in her palm for me once.
The rhythm.
Gave it to me to preserve like a secret,
watched it film through fingers like water,
shattering upon pavement
and this is all metaphor
for love…or friendship…..or human..

..and it’s so easy to break.

—but yeah the hands,
took this as proof that she never
needed her own body to hide,
just a pulse and some days not even that.

“where are you? I’m not playing hide and go seek anymore”

Can’t you hear him?
playing a piano forged of teeth,
little jewels of light shrieking into dark,
an eclipse of noise, echoing off the earth
and we are a solstice away from his body,
“He’s not…gone, is he? I never got to say goodbye.”
I just know it.
He’s somewhere ‘round here, waning.
“I think I found something,”—-> ….something
beneath the soil throbs,
yearniin’ to be found, seen,
“Only a make-up kit”
filled to brim with instruments used to vanish one’s self,
marked with the hand print of a father
on the underside,                            an omen to the touched
buried,
cloaked in maggots and dirt

“where are you?”

and out from the hands of the water,
they all drift,
a collection of heads with no faces,
bodies mangled and worn, wearing sweaters
woven from the thread of hair
and the mouth, nursed in pocket
begins to sing for the forgotten,
for the dead learning to breathe without air.
For those that leaves this place with only a memory….
and some days,
not even that…

2015 American Voices Nominee: Jack Braun

how to kiss death

by Jack Braun, 7th Grade, Rodeph Sholom & Writopia

2015 Gold Key/American Voices Nominee

(Image Credit: Death of the Unknown by Edgar Barrios, 2015 Gold Key, Drawing & Illustration, 12th Grade, High School of Art & Design)

I don’t believe in
History class for the same reason
I don’t believe in
ghosts:

maybe, just
maybe if I don’t believe
in it,
it will go away.
maybe, just
maybe if I don’t think about
it,
it will
cease.
to.
exist.

History class,
that is.
ghosts will always linger
somewhere. everyone
knows that.

it’s not that I don’t
like
History,
it’s just that I don’t…
fine,  I don’t like History class
there. I said it. quote me.
it’s not the teacher or the homework.
(I mean, I get As and B+s)
I study! I have fun!

but how do you
believe in something that
you don’t know it positively happened?
yes, evidenceblahblahblah,
but I wasn’t there!
(fine, I’m a narcissist.)

and we don’t know it happened!
like we don’t
KNOW that ghosts
really exist!

History and ghosts.
two things that go well together:
put in some
Genocide, one cup of
Evil, a teaspoon of
Heroism, a pinch of
War with some sugar on top,
Sugar that tastes like blood.

Because that
is
what
History is.
Genocide and Evil (a bit of heroism) and War and Sugary Blood.
and, like Halloween,
Death and ghosts come out
of the shadows
in the night.
but mostly death and
I wish there was a book
in the library, called:
How to Kiss Death

and I wish this because most people don’t
understand why they die.
it’s because they won’t accept Death,
because they don’t want to become just another
spot on the map of History

page one:

there’s no going back,
but once you go back you’re on Death’s list.
suddenly, swiftly, Death will attack.
and then, big and bolded, chapter one: How to Kiss

you should wait in the shadows
until Death comes, pitying you,
and you cry from your sore mouth
and bleeding lips and broken heart,
Death will cease your fears and your worries and
Death will Kiss you and all of your dreams will come true and
Death will help you and hurt you and make you better than you ever were and
Death will kill you but it will be worth it and
Death will Kiss you with its salty lips until
Death sucks all of the pain out of you,
Death stops the crying and reverses the clock and
Death will help you-
and then I closed
the book
and
shut
my
eyes
tight.

because, well, Death?!
No one wants to think about Death!

(oh, but, like, sorry if you’re maybe thinking about death right now…?)

and if I don’t think about it,
maybe, maybe it will go away,
Death might sneak back to the dusty corner
it came from, and it might go back from where it came from,
Death might retreat from History and History might not
be full of ghosts and ghosts
might Kiss Death back–

but I don’t think about those things,
it’s bad to think about– or is it?

is it bad to plan your future,
to remember your past, to acknowledge
the dead who
Kissed Death back

yes, it is bad,
yes.

maybe, just
maybe if I don’t believe
in it,
it will go away.
maybe, just
maybe if I don’t think about
it,
it will
cease.
to.
exist.

but,
it is good to delve in,
for another bite,
another lesson,
another Kiss.
I open the book;
Chapter two:

Don’t Resist.

Deadline Extended for Teen Art Gallery! – March 6th!

T.A.G. (Teen Art Gallery) is accepting submissions for their 2015 Art Exhibition!  T.A.G. is one of NYC Scholastic Art & Writing Awards’ favorite programs!  They are run by teens for teens.  If you submitted to the Awards, why not submit to T.A.G. as well?

Teen Art Gallery is a group formed and run by teens from different schools in NYC to 10455234_727768350595297_3273411259554446510_nexhibit art created by teens from around the world.  Our mission is to make it possible for teenage artists to show their work in real galleries.

We produce several art exhibits each year in Manhattan. Our gallery shows feature artwork created by teens from around the world in all categories, including: Photography, Performance, Poetry, Video, Writing, Comics, Animation, Installation, Painting, Drawing, and Sculpture.

T.A.G. Mission Statement

For some young-adults, the art world– full of white walls, art dealers and established artists–can be intimidating. We may have difficulty approaching this world even if we are well endowed in both maturity and talent. Our difficulty is partly due to the lack of knowledge that coincides with the limiting environment assigned to us because of our age. T.A.G.’s goal is to eliminate this limitation when present and provide fellow teenaged-students with the opportunity to take part in displaying their works in a gallery. T.A.G. reaches out to all young artists so that they are not alone in figuring out the process of showing their work in a gallery setting.

10431437_738255806213218_4997357745188541344_n

Many teenagers are immensely talented and sophisticated in their use of techniques, such that their place in a gallery is beyond well deserved.

For details on how to submit please visit T.A.G.’s FAQ page by clicking here!

Emoti-Con Design Fellow Applications Due January 9th!

Our pals at Parsons are accepting applications to become a Parsons Emoti-Con Design Fellow!

What does this mean?

Emoti-Con is the annual NYC Youth Digital Media & Technology Challenge. The Emoti-Con! Design Fellows are the youth who make Emoti-Con happen! Design Fellows work on graphic design projects (signs, t-shirts, flyers), post on social media to spread the word and get people excited, and help teens get prepared to participate. They also help plan the day, coming up with ideas for everything from swag and giveaways to what speakers should be on the stage. On the day of Emoti-Con, the Design Fellows are the greeters, MCs, and show-runners, and create a brand-new game or design challenge every year that every single person who comes to Emoti-Con participates in! (Note: The Emoti-Con Design Fellows program used to be called “A-Team.”)Emoti-Con group

What do you have to do?

-Be in 9th, 10th, 11th, or 12th grade in NYC!

-Commit to attending 9-11 of the Free Saturday sessions at Parsons The New School for Design January 31-April 18 (except March 28), from 10:00am-1:00pm.

What’s in it for you? (In addition to knowing that you are totally awesome and you have been part of something AMAZING, you will…)

* gain experience in graphic design, game design, event planning, and public speaking from a Parsons instructor — all great skills for college applications, job applications, and life!
* meet awesome teens from across NYC!
* be able to request a transcript you can use for college applications, which will say that you completed a Parsons Pre-College Academy class!
* receive a letter of recommendation from the instructor that you can use for college applications!

DetailsEmoti-Con happy

Applications are due January 9th, 2015.

Applications & more information available here!

Take a look at past the Emoti-Cons and learn about the cool projects teens are creating that positively affect the world around them here!

parsons-the-new-school-for-design-logo-61dtuatu

Upcoming Events at the Met!

Did you know the Met offers free programming for NYC Teens?  Time to plan for a rough winter?  hang out with the Met’s masterpieces and make some of your own!

Take a look below and see what is coming up.  These programs are free but the spots fill up, so click on the links and reserve your spot ASAP.

 Swimming at Ōiso, Distant View of Mount Fuji (detail), Meiji period (1868–1912), 1893. Japan.
Swimming at Ōiso, Distant View of Mount Fuji (detail), Meiji period (1868–1912), 1893. Japan.

On Friday, Dec. 12th, explore careers in the arts at Career Lab: Write, then create your own poetry inspired by works of art at Get Wrapped Up: Poetry and the Art of the Kimono – Poetry Workshop!

Surupa Sen and Bijayini Satpathy, the principal dancers of India’s world-renowned Nrityagram dance troupe
Surupa Sen and Bijayini Satpathy, the principal dancers of India’s world-renowned Nrityagram dance troupe

On Saturday, January 10th, join other teens for Saturday Sketching: Vessels & Volumes (all materials are provided!) then stick around for the 5pm performance of Nrityagram by a traditional Indian dance troupe.

See you there!

 

Submissions are open for Teen Art Gallery!

T.A.G. (Teen Art Gallery) is accepting submissions for their 2015 Art Exhibition!  T.A.G. is one of NYC Scholastic Art & Writing Awards’ favorite programs!  They are run by teens for teens.  If you are planning on submitting to the Awards, why not submit to T.A.G. as well?

Teen Art Gallery is a group formed and run by teens from different schools in NYC to exhibit art created by teens from around the world.  Our mission is to make it possible for teenage artists to show their work in real galleries.

We produce several art exhibits each year in Manhattan. Our gallery shows feature artwork created by teens from around the world in all categories, including: Photography, Performance, Poetry, Video, Writing, Comics, Animation, Installation, Painting, Drawing, and Sculpture.

T.A.G. Mission Statement

For some young-adults, the art world– full of white walls, art dealers and established artists–can be intimidating. We may have difficulty approaching this world even if we are well endowed in both maturity and talent. Our difficulty is partly due to the lack of knowledge that coincides with the limiting environment assigned to us because of our age. T.A.G.’s goal is to eliminate this limitation when present and provide fellow teenaged-students with the opportunity to take part in displaying their works in a gallery. T.A.G. reaches out to all young artists so that they are not alone in figuring out the process of showing their work in a gallery setting.

Many teenagers are immensely talented and sophisticated in their use of techniques, such that their place in a gallery is beyond well deserved.

For details on how to submit please visit T.A.G.’s FAQ page by clicking here!