Glad We Met, The World In Yellow

Glad We Met

When she was five years old
she fell in love.

A charming fellow
eyes the color of his skin
proud outstretched arms
like a small superhero.
A gigantic contagious smile
stretched cheeks
warm face.

He lives alone stationed within a glass case.
She visits him every time she visits the museum.

She navigates past crowds
through the sounds of conversations
bouncing off walls
with the volume of an echo under a thousand bridges.
She walks past
oil paintings,
mastabas,
chiseled white statues.

She sees him.

She smiles in the wonderful silence
in the back room that no one bothers to find.
It is always just the two of them.

To curators he is:
“A hollow ceramic figure from the Remjodas region of Veracruz, Mexico.
Handmade in the eighth century, stands nineteen inches tall.
God of dance, music, joy.
Smiling Figure.”

To her he is her small clay soulmate.
The two of them traveled so far to get here.
They wear physical cracks and internal marks across their chests.

He will always remain in his gallery
within his glass case.
No more cracks.
No more stories.
He will be kind, familiar, ever-smiling.

She will return to share her stories with him.

The World in Yellow

A welcoming glow pours through
yellow-tinted windows.
Casts brightness and warmth on everything inside.

These windows separate
art and education
from the
bustlingworldoutside.
They divide
the blended paints
and the mirrored room sprinkled with strings of lights
from the
speedingtaxis
and briefcases attached to harried businessmen.

The world within the yellow is
a shelter
a meeting place
the crossroads where beauty, history, and ideas
collide and come together.

This haven of possibilities has lovingly held me
taught me the importance of detail, structure, composition.
It has shown me passion, pain, excitement
through every brushstroke and perfectly composed photograph.

In this space
peering out to the everyday offers a calm focus
to an otherwise frantic city.

Inspired.
I look through sunshine-tinted glasses
and creatively perceive a world of possibilities.

Niki Sanders, Age 18, Grade 12, Hunter College High School, Silver Key

This entry was written by NYC Scholastic Awards and published on November 6, 2013 at 2:00 pm. It’s filed under Poetry, Writing. Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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